A profile of the caring attributes of Hong Kong and Thailand psychiatric nurses

David Arthur, Colin Chong, Darunee Rujkorakarn, Doris Wong, Narisa Wongpanarak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the unique cultural characteristics of psychiatric nurses in Hong Kong and Thailand little has been written about them or their caring practices. This study set out to examine the caring practices and demographic features of nurses working in these two countries where the development of the nursing education system has distinct similarities, yet where culture, career paths and qualifications differ. The Caring Attributes Questionnaire (CAQ), previously used in general nursing samples, was modified and validated for the study and administered to 275 and 227 psychiatric nurses in Hong Kong and Thailand, respectively. The results showed that more of the Hong Kong nurses were educated at the degree level and they tended to be younger, while both had around the same number of years of experience. The CAQ scores increase significantly with position, age and years of experience in the Hong Kong sample yet not for qualifications, while there were no significant differences detected in the Thai sample. The Thai sample had significantly lower CAQ scores and the results suggest that neither education nor experience modify these qualities of a psychiatric nurse, and it may be that nurses are still learning 'on the job' rather than in the school. These findings are discussed in the light of findings from other international studies and recommendations for future studies are made.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Caring
  • Culture
  • Hong Kong
  • Thailand psychiatric nursing

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