A protocol for a multi-site, spatially-referenced household survey in slum settings: Methods for access, sampling frame construction, sampling, and field data collection

Pauline Bakibinga, Caroline Kabaria, Catherine Kyobutungi, Anthony Manyara, Nelson Mbaya, Shukri Mohammed, Anne Njeri, Iqbal Azam, Romaina Iqbal, Shahida Mazaffar, Narjis Rizvi, Tayyaba Rizvi, Hamid Ur Rehman, Syed A.K. Shifat Ahmed, Ornob Alam, Afreen Zaman Khan, Omar Rahman, Rita Yusuf, Doyin Odubanjo, Montunrayo AyobolaFunke Fayehun, Akinyinka Omigbodun, Eme Owoaje, Olalekan Taiwo, Peter Diggle, Navneet Aujla, Yen Fu Chen, Paramjit Gill, Frances Griffiths, Bronwyn Harris, Jason Madan, Richard J. Lilford, Oyinlola R. Oyobode, Vangelis Pitidis, Joao Porto De Albequerque, Jo Sartori, Celia Taylor, Philip Ulbrich, Olalekan Uthman, Samuel I. Watson, Godwin Yeboah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Household surveys are a key epidemiological, medical, and social research method. In poor urban environments, such as slums, censuses can often be out-of-date or fail to record transient residents, maps may be incomplete, and access to sites can be limit, all of which prohibits obtaining an accurate sampling frame. This article describes a method to conduct a survey in slum settings in the context of the NIHR Global Health Research Unit on Improving Health in Slums project. Methods: We identify four key steps: obtaining site access, generation of a sampling frame, sampling, and field data collection. Stakeholder identification and engagement is required to negotiate access. A spatially-referenced sampling frame can be generated by: remote participatory mapping from satellite imagery; local participatory mapping and ground-truthing; and identification of all residents of each structure. We propose to use a spatially-regulated sampling method to ensure spatial coverage across the site. Finally, data collection using tablet devices and open-source software can be conducted using the generated sample and maps. Discussion: Slums are home to a growing population who face some of the highest burdens of disease yet who remain relatively understudied. Difficulties conducting surveys in these locations may explain this disparity. We propose a generalisable, scientifically valid method that is sustainable and ensures community engagement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number109
JournalBMC Medical Research Methodology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • GIS
  • Sampling
  • Slum
  • Survey

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