Association of experienced and internalized stigma with self-disclosure of HIV status by youth living with HIV

Cyrus Mugo, David Seeh, Brandon Guthrie, Megan Moreno, Manasi Kumar, Grace John-Stewart, Irene Inwani, Keshet Ronen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined patterns of disclosure among youth living with HIV (YLHIV) in Kenya, and the association between self-disclosure and antiretroviral therapy adherence, stigma, depression, resilience, and social support. Of 96 YLHIV, 78% were female, 33% were ages 14–18, and 40% acquired HIV perinatally. Sixty-three (66%) YLHIV had self-disclosed their HIV status; 67% to family and 43% to non-family members. Older YLHIV were 75% more likely to have self-disclosed than those 14–18 years. Of the 68 either married or ever sexually active, 45 (66%) did not disclose to their partners. Those who had self-disclosed were more likely to report internalized stigma (50% vs. 21%, prevalence ratio [PR] 2.3, 1.1–4.6), experienced stigma (26% vs. 3%, PR 11.0, 1.4–86), and elevated depressive symptoms (57% vs. 30%, PR 1.8, 1.0–3.1). The association with stigma was stronger with self-disclosure to family than non-family. Support should be provided to YLHIV during self-disclosure to mitigate psychosocial harms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2084-2093
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Depression
  • Disclosure
  • HIV
  • Mental health
  • Resilience
  • Social support
  • Stigma

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Association of experienced and internalized stigma with self-disclosure of HIV status by youth living with HIV'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this