Frequency of consumption and nutrient composition of composite dishes commonly consumed in the UK by South Asian Muslims originating from Bangladesh, Pakistan and East Africa (Ismailis)

T. Kassam-Khamis, P. A. Judd, J. E. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. This paper presents information on the nutrient composition of commonly consumed traditional dishes eaten by the three major South Asian Muslim groups residing in Britain, namely Bangladeshi, Pakistani and East African Ismaili Muslims. Methods. Information regarding the most common dishes consumed by South Asian Muslims originating from Bangladesh, Pakistan and East Africa (Ismailis) and living in London was obtained from 7-day menu records over two seasons. For each common dish, weighed recipes were collected in triplicate and the composition (energy and selected nutrients) was calculated from the ingredients and cooked weight of the dish. Results. The three Muslim groups showed considerable variation in traditional foods commonly consumed as well as variation in fat and energy contents of similar recipes both within and between groups. Nutrient composition of commonly consumed dishes is presented calculated from the recipe nearest the average in terms of fat and energy for a particular dish. Discussion and conclusions. The potential uses of the data, one of which would be to improve dietary compliance (especially to lower fat intakes) amongst the three diverse South Asian Muslim groups, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-196
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

Keywords

  • Bangladeshi
  • Common dishes
  • Ismaili
  • Nutrient composition
  • Pakistani
  • South Asian

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