Gender Differences in Clinical Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention—Analysis of 15,106 Patients from the Cardiac Registry of Pakistan Database

Ghazal Peerwani, Saud Munib Khan, Mustafa Dilawar Khan, Faiza Bashir, Sana Sheikh, David J. Ramsey, Saba Aijaz, Zainab Samad, Rehan Malik, Bashir Hanif, Salim S. Virani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a scarcity of data on gender differences in outcomes during and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the South Asian population. We assessed the gender differences in in-hospital mortality and complications in patients who underwent PCI. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 15,106 patients from the CROP (Cardiac Registry of Pakistan) CathPCI database. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), access site hematoma, and bleeding complications. Approximately 19.6% were women. Women were older (mean age = 57.3 vs 54.4 years) and had a higher prevalence of diabetes (49.3% vs 32.6%), hypertension (72.8% vs 56.4%), peripheral arterial disease (1.5% vs 1%), and cerebrovascular accident (1.2% vs 0.8%) than men (p <0.05).Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was higher in women than in men (odds ratio [OR]: 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 2.2); however, after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes, history of cerebrovascular accident, and ST-elevation myocardial infarction at presentation in the multiple logistic regression model, in-hospital mortality was comparable between men and women (adjusted OR [AOR] 1.2, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.7). The results remained consistent after propensity score matching of 5,904 patients (2,952 in each group, OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.0 for in-hospital mortality). Bleeding complications (1.2% vs 0.4%, AOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.5) and access site hematoma (2% vs 0.6%, AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 4.5) were higher in women than in men. In conclusion, the incidence of in-hospital mortality was higher for women versus men, but adjusted risks were similar, likely driven by a greater co-morbidity burden among women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2023
Externally publishedYes

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