Intestinal Colonization With Bifidobacterium longum Subspecies Is Associated With Length at Birth, Exclusive Breastfeeding, and Decreased Risk of Enteric Virus Infections, but Not With Histo-Blood Group Antigens, Oral Vaccine Response or Later Growth in Three Birth Cohorts

Josh M. Colston, Mami Taniuchi, Tahmina Ahmed, Tania Ferdousi, Furqan Kabir, Estomih Mduma, Rosemary Nshama, Najeeha Talat Iqbal, Rashidul Haque, Tahmeed Ahmed, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutta, Margaret N. Kosek, James A. Platts-Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bifidobacterium longum subspecies detected in infant stool have been associated with numerous subsequent health outcomes and are potential early markers of deviation from healthy developmental trajectories. This analysis derived indicators of carriage and early colonization with B. infantis and B. longum and quantified their associations with a panel of early-life exposures and outcomes. In a sub-study nested within a multi-site birth cohort, extant stool samples from infants in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Tanzania were tested for presence and quantity of two Bifidobacterium longum subspecies. The results were matched to indicators of nutritional status, enteropathogen infection, histo-blood group antigens, vaccine response and feeding status and regression models were fitted to test for associations while adjusting for covariates. B. infantis was associated with lower quantity of and decreased odds of colonization with B. longum, and vice versa. Length at birth was associated with a 0.36 increase in log10 B. infantis and a 0.28 decrease in B. longum quantity at 1 month of age. B. infantis colonization was associated with fewer viral infections and small reductions in the risk of rotavirus and sapovirus infections, but not reduced overall diarrheal disease risk. No associations with vaccine responses, HBGAs or later nutritional status were identified. Suboptimal intrauterine growth and a shorter duration of exclusive breastfeeding may predispose infants to early intestinal colonization with the B. longum subspecies at the expense of B. infantis, thus denying them potential benefits of reduced enteric virus episodes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number804798
JournalFrontiers in Pediatrics
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Bifidobacteria
  • cohort study
  • global health
  • infant nutrition
  • microbiome

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Intestinal Colonization With Bifidobacterium longum Subspecies Is Associated With Length at Birth, Exclusive Breastfeeding, and Decreased Risk of Enteric Virus Infections, but Not With Histo-Blood Group Antigens, Oral Vaccine Response or Later Growth in Three Birth Cohorts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this