Levels and determinants of fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide in kitchens using biomass and non-biomass fuel for cooking

Zafar Fatmi, Georgia Ntani, David Coggon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assist interpretation of a study in rural Pakistan on the use of biomass for cooking and the risk of coronary heart disease, we continuously monitored airborne concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) for up to 48 h in the kitchens of households randomly selected from the parent study. Satisfactory data on PM2.5 and CO respectively were obtained for 16 and 17 households using biomass, and 19 and 17 using natural gas. Linear regression analysis indicated that in comparison with kitchens using natural gas, daily average PM2.5 concentrations were substantially higher in kitchens that used biomass in either a chimney stove (mean difference 611, 95% CI: 359, 863 µg/m3) or traditional three-stone stove (mean difference 389, 95% CI: 231, 548 µg/m3). Daily average concentrations of CO were significantly increased when biomass was used in a traditional stove (mean difference from natural gas 3.7, 95% CI: 0.8, 6.7 ppm), but not when it was used in a chimney stove (mean difference −0.8, 95% CI: −4.8, 3.2 ppm). Any impact of smoking by household members was smaller than that of using biomass, and not clearly discernible. In the population studied, cooking with biomass as compared with natural gas should serve as a good proxy for higher personal exposure to PM2.5.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1287
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Biomass
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Kitchen
  • Monitoring
  • Natural gas
  • Particulate matter

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