Migration status, work conditions and health utilization of female sex workers in three South African Cities

Marlise Richter, Matthew F. Chersich, Jo Vearey, Benn Sartorius, Marleen Temmerman, Stanley Luchters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intersections between migration and sex work are underexplored in southern Africa, a region with high internal and cross-border population mobility, and HIV prevalence. Sex work often constitutes an important livelihood activity for migrant women. In 2010, sex workers trained as interviewers conducted cross-sectional surveys with 1,653 female sex workers in Johannesburg (Hillbrow and Sandton), Rustenburg and Cape Town. Most (85.3 %) sex workers were migrants (1396/1636): 39.0 % (638/1636) internal and 46.3 % (758/1636) cross-border. Cross-border migrants had higher education levels, predominately worked part-time, mainly at indoor venues, and earned more per client than other groups. They, however, had 41 % lower health service contact (adjusted odds ratio = 0.59; 95 % confidence interval = 0.40-0.86) and less frequent condom use than non-migrants. Police interaction was similar. Cross-border migrants appear more tenacious in certain aspects of sex work, but require increased health service contact. Migrant-sensitive, sex work-specific health care and health education are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-17
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Condoms
  • Health care utilization
  • Migration status
  • Sex work
  • South Africa

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