Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in a nationally representative adult population with inflammatory bowel disease without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Tanushree Agrawal, Isaac Acquah, Amit K. Dey, Kerri Glassner, Bincy Abraham, Ron Blankstein, Salim S. Virani, Michael J. Blaha, Javier Valero-Elizondo, Nehal Mehta, Eamonn MM Quigley, Miguel Cainzos-Achirica, Khurram Nasir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Chronic inflammation is associated with premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). We studied the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) amongst individuals with IBD who have not developed ASCVD. Methods: Our study population was derived from the 2015 – 2016 National Health Interview Survey. Those with ASCVD (defined as myocardial infarction, angina or stroke) were excluded. The prevalence of CRFs among individuals with IBD was compared with those without IBD. The odds CRFs among adults with IBD was assessed using logistic regression models. Results: In our study population of 60,155 individuals, 786 (1.3%) had IBD. IBD was associated with increased odds hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39–2.09), diabetes (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.22–2.32), hypercholesterolemia (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.32–2.99) and insufficient physical activity (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.16–1.66). Conclusion: IBD is associated with higher prevalence of CRFs. Early screening and risk mitigation strategies are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100171
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Risk factors

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in a nationally representative adult population with inflammatory bowel disease without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this