Privacy metrics in ubiquitous computing applications

Said Jafari, Fredrick Mtenzi, Ciaran O'Driscoll, Ronan Fitzpatrick, Brendan O'Shea

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The move to ubiquitous computing is underway fueled by both the advancements in technology and the need to free users from managing system operations. To achieve this, devices have to acquire sufficient and relevant information to provide the required services. This information is acquired without human assistance thus it poses a threat to personal and organisational privacy. Measuring the degree of privacy offered by a particular ubiquitous computing application is a challenging undertaking. A major difficulty lies on the interpretation of the term 'privacy' itself. However, to ensure successful use of these applications for both users and organisations, it is important to devise a means to measure privacy. This extended abstract brings forward a discussion to measure the degree of privacy offered by a particular ubiquitous application by assessing systems' components and their information needs. To address the problem, privacy metrics are to be designed These metrics will be of benefit to systems' designers as well as to users of applications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, ICITST 2010
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event2010 International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, ICITST 2010 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Nov 201011 Nov 2010

Publication series

Name2010 International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, ICITST 2010

Conference

Conference2010 International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, ICITST 2010
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period8/11/1011/11/10

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