Resting state functional connectivity patterns associated with pharmacological treatment resistance in temporal lobe epilepsy

Christina Pressl, Philip Brandner, Stefan Schaffelhofer, Karen Blackmon, Patricia Dugan, Manisha Holmes, Thomas Thesen, Ruben Kuzniecky, Orrin Devinsky, Winrich A. Freiwald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are no functional imaging based biomarkers for pharmacological treatment response in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In this study, we investigated whether there is an association between resting state functional brain connectivity (RsFC) and seizure control in TLE. We screened a large database containing resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Rs-fMRI) data from 286 epilepsy patients. Patient medical records were screened for seizure characterization, EEG reports for lateralization and location of seizure foci to establish uniformity of seizure localization within patient groups. Rs-fMRI data from patients with well-controlled left TLE, patients with treatment-resistant left TLE, and healthy controls were analyzed. Healthy controls and cTLE showed similar functional connectivity patterns, whereas trTLE exhibited a significant bilateral decrease in thalamo-hippocampal functional connectivity. This work is the first to demonstrate differences in neural network connectivity between well-controlled and treatment-resistant TLE. These differences are spatially highly focused and suggest sites for the etiology and possibly treatment of TLE. Altered thalamo-hippocampal RsFC thus is a potential new biomarker for TLE treatment resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-43
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsy Research
Volume149
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Epilepsy
  • Resting State fMRI
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy
  • Treatment response
  • fMRI

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