The association between neighborhood socioeconomic status and exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets

Karen E. Smoyer-Tomic, John C. Spence, Kim D. Raine, Carl Amrhein, Nairne Cameron, Vladimir Yasenovskiy, Nicoleta Cutumisu, Eric Hemphill, Julia Healy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines whether exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets varies with neighborhood-level socioeconomic status in Edmonton, Canada. Only market area and fast food proximity predicted supermarket exposure. For fast food outlets, the odds of exposure were greater in areas with more Aboriginals, renters, lone parents, low-income households, and public transportation commuters; and lower in those with higher median income and dwelling value. Low wealth, renter-occupied, and lone parent neighborhoods had greater exposure to fast food outlets, which was not offset by better supermarket access. The implications are troubling for fast food consumption among lone parent families in light of growing obesity rates among children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)740-754
Number of pages15
JournalHealth and Place
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Canada
  • Edmonton
  • Fast food
  • Supermarket

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