The current state of laboratory mycology in Asia/Pacific: A survey from the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) and International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM)

Jon Salmanton-García, Wing Yan Au, Martin Hoenigl, Louis Yi Ann Chai, Hamid Badali, Ariful Basher, Ronja A. Brockhoff, Sharon C.A. Chen, Ariya Chindamporn, Anuradha Chowdhary, Christopher H. Heath, Kausar Jabeen, Jaehyeon Lee, Madonna Matar, Saad Jaber Taj-Aldeen, Ban Hock Tan, Kenji Uno, Retno Wahyuningsih, Liping Zhu, Arunaloke ChakrabartiOliver A. Cornely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in Asia/Pacific are a particular threat to patients with malignancies, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or undiagnosed/untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Adequate and early access to diagnostic tools and antifungals is essential for IFI clinical management and patient survival. Methods: Details on institution profile, self-perception on IFI, and access to microscopy, culture, serology, antigen detection, molecular testing, and therapeutic drug monitoring for IFI were collected in a survey. Results: As of June 2022, 235 centres from 40 countries/territories in Asia/Pacific answered the questionnaire. More than half the centres were from six countries: India (25%), China (17%), Thailand (5%), Indonesia, Iran, and Japan (4% each). Candida spp. (93%) and Aspergillus spp. (75%) were considered the most relevant pathogens. Most institutions had access to microscopy (98%) or culture-based approaches (97%). Furthermore, 79% of centres had access to antigen detection, 66% to molecular assays, and 63% to antibody tests. Access to antifungals varied between countries/territories. At least one triazole was available in 93% of the reporting sites (voriconazole [89%] was the most common mould-active azole), whereas 80% had at least one amphotericin B formulation, and 72% had at least one echinocandin. Conclusion: According to the replies provided, the resources available for IFI diagnosis and management vary among Asia/Pacific countries/territories. Economical or geographical factors may play a key role in the incidence and clinical handling of this disease burden. Regional cooperation may be a good strategy to overcome shortcomings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106718
JournalInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2023

Keywords

  • Asia/Pacific
  • diagnostic capacity
  • invasive fungal infection
  • medical mycology
  • treatment

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